Conservation

2016 Josephine Daneman Herz International Seabird Fellows

In 2016 there were three Seabird Fellows

Miguel Corrales was born in Culiacán, Mexico. He holds a degree in biology from the Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa (2010). Miguel has worked full time with Grupo de Ecología y Conservación de Islas, A.C. since 2014 where he has gained wide experience with fauna management and monitoring. Some of the islands that he has worked on are: “La Partida” in the Gulf of California, as well as “Revillagigedo” and “Las Marías” Archipelagos in the tropics. His present duties involve banding, setting up social attraction systems and habitat restoration. His most recent assignment is to help restore seabirds to seven Mexican Islands on the Pacific coast of Baja California.

Jonathan dos Santos holds a degree in veterinary medicine from the College Pio Decimo-FPD/SE. He has experience in rescue, rehabilitation and release of marine animals. He served as an intern at the Foundation for Aquatic Mammals investigating the causes of marine mammal stranding. He has studied the effects of plastics and marine debris on the digestive tract of seabirds. He has also taken post graduate courses in Animal Science at McGill-University. In Brazil he is working with Dr. Bruno Jackson Melo de Almeida on the Coastal-marine birds Program in Northeast Brazil. This program focuses son understanding the use of nonbreeding habitat, molt, blood characteristics, and environmental education with local fisherman. Jonathan is participating with the assistance of the Audubon International Alliance Program.

Fernando Solis graduated from the Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon with a B.Sc in Biology. Since 2013 he has worked for Grupo de Ecologia y Conservacion de Islas, a conservation institution that aims to preserve the flora and fauna of the Mexican Islands. He has worked on restoration programs studying breeding biology and populations of seabirds at different islands of the north pacific and lately on the eastern tropical pacific region where he has led the monitoring program of seabirds of Revillagigedo Archipelago (Mexico’s “Galapagos”).

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